Tesla Model 3 under solar carport

The Tesla Model 3 can be recharged with electricity generated by our solar carport.  Took delivery two weeks ago, and wow is this car fun to drive!  Unrelenting acceleration, silent, and a firm ride.  The streaming music is impressive too.  “Play X by Y,” and the car finds the song and plays it.  No more gas and no more carbon dioxide!

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Tesla charging

IMG_2847_cropOver two years ago, on March 31, 2016, I waited in line to reserve a Tesla Model 3.  I have been excited ever since.  I was recently invited to configure; at the end of March 2018.  I quickly placed the order, received a VIN a few days later, and will take delivery in about three weeks.  I will finally have a car that is powered by the sun!

While waiting, I had an electrician install a NEMA 14-30 outlet on one of the columns of the solar carport (see picture).  The underground conduit that was added when the carport was built could not accommodate a higher amperage circuit.  NEMA 14-30 is the standard outlet used for clothes dryers.  Tesla sells a NEMA 14-30 adapter, which adds 22 miles of range per hour of charge.  This is more than sufficient to fully recharge the battery overnight.

Four years with solar power

usage-vs-generation-2016

Electricity generated from solar power offset yearly usage by 104%.  We used 5,119 kWH / year (averaged over nine years).  Our 4.3 kW system generated 5,338 kWH / year (averaged over four years).

I still clearly remember when the solar carport was built as if it were yesterday, yet it’s been four years.  As a new year dawns, I wanted to plot our average electricity generated and benchmark relative to the original PVWatts estimate made (and posted below) before the panels were installed.

I am now even more in awe of PVWatts.  As you can see from the graph, the yellow curve is the estimated generation, based on our location, solar array size and panel angle relative to the sun.  The green curve is four years of actual data, and it it overlays almost perfectly.  As I’ve noted below, now with emphasis, PVWatts really and truly is a solar seer.

Solarize Carrboro

Solarize Carrboro

Spring is here and with it comes lots of sun.  For those of you who are considering solar power or want to learn more about it, check out the Solarize Carrboro website.

With the Solarize Carrboro discounts plus state and federal tax incentives, now is a great time to go solar.

They will hold a kick-off meeting April 2, 2014 at 7 pm at Carrboro Town Hall (301 W. Main Street, Carrboro, NC 27510).  At this kick-off meeting, the Solarize Carrboro team will step homeowners through the process, including solar equipment, tax incentives, installation, and financing.  Carrboro solar homeowners will also be on hand to answer questions.

See their website for details on how to RSVP for the event.

They’ve selected two installers–Southern Energy Management (the company that installed our Solar Carport) and Yes! Solar Solutions.

This is worth checking out.  And if you don’t live in Carrboro, check your local area for a Solarize program.  There is Solarize Durham; Solarize Raleigh, Solarize Mass (for MA), Solarize Seattle; to name just a few.

Contact the North Carolina Utilities Commission, to oppose changes to net metering

As mentioned below, net metering is under attack in NC.  I just got an email from Maria Kingery, CEO of Southern Energy Management (the company that installed our solar system), describing how to contact the NC Utilities Commission:

#1.  Write an email to the “Chief Clerk of the Commission.” Include “Docket E-100, Sub 83: Net Metering” as the subject.

  • Identify Yourself
  • In your letter, please let the  commission know who you are and why you decided to invest in solar.  YOUR story is important for them to hear and appreciate.
  • Tell the Utilities Commission: “I DO NOT support changes to net metering that will kill rooftop solar in North Carolina.
  • Ask the Utilities Commission to oppose changes to net metering!

#2.  Send your email to the Utilities Commission: statements@ncuc.net or by U.S. mail to:    North Carolina Utilities Commission, 4325 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699

I feel it is important to fight to keep net metering, to keep solar power strong in America.  I just sent off my email.

Solar Seer

A seer is someone who can predict the future.  In this case, the Solar Seer is PVWatts (http://www.nrel.gov/rredc/pvwatts/), a program that calculates how much power a photovoltaic energy system will generate.  When I crunched the numbers back when our solar carport was commissioned, PVWatts predicted our system would generate slightly more power than we typically use in a year (106% more to be precise, see post below).

With 2013 over, I looked over the numbers.

Our solar carport generated 5,306 kWh (5.3 megawatt hr) in 2013.

This is 105% more power than we used in 2013 (we used 5,045 kWh).  PVWatts was thus dead on when it came to predicting power production.

So there are two take home messages:  1) By going solar, we’ve now eliminated our electricity footprint on this earth (at least with respect to our home electricity usage).  2) PVWatts is amazing.  Believe what it tells you.

Net Metering under attack in NC. Duke Energy seeks to reduce payment for solar power by half

Duke Energy, North Carolina’s largest electric utility, just announced they are seeking to reduce payments for solar power from 11¢ / kWh to 5-7¢ / kWh.  Article here:  http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/01/22/4632118/duke-energy-to-seek-reduction.html

While this may seem like a minor issue, it isn’t.  This would have a devastating impact on the payback period for residential solar.  And it would make going solar uneconomical for residential customers.

For those not familiar with Net Metering:  when a solar system generates excess power, the house electric meter runs backwards and credits build up.  These credits are currently equal to the rate that consumers pay for electricity (about 11¢ / kWh).  So, when the sun is not shining, you get power from the electric company at the same rate.

Seems like a fair trade:  11¢ / kWh for power from the sun; 11¢ / kWh for power from the grid.

Duke Energy is greedy and wants to discount power from the sun as follows:  5-7¢ / kWh for power from the sun; 11¢ / kWh for power from the grid.

Does that seem fair?

Solar power doesn’t pollute.  Solar power is a renewable resource.  And contrary to what power companies say, solar power doesn’t tax or strain their power grid.  Excess solar power flows to your neighbors houses, providing power near its point of generation.